Hydrocephalus in Uganda for CNN
Hydrocephalus in Uganda for CNN

A boy diagnosed with hydrocephalus cries on a bed at Cure Children's Hospital on February 5, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Hydrocephalus is a condition in which an excess of cerebral fluid accumulates in the brain. The condition, which can be extremely fatal left untreated, causes a harmful amount of pressure on the head and a increase head size.

 Patients with Hydrocephalus wait for a nurse to make his rounds at Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

Patients with Hydrocephalus wait for a nurse to make his rounds at Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

 Excess fluid is seen in a CT scan of a brain at Cure Children's Hospital on February 2, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. The hospital owns one of two CT scan machines serving 8 million people in eastern Uganda.

Excess fluid is seen in a CT scan of a brain at Cure Children's Hospital on February 2, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. The hospital owns one of two CT scan machines serving 8 million people in eastern Uganda.

 Doctors operate on a patient at Cure Children's Hospital in Mbale, Uganda on February 6, 2017. The hospital has performed more than 10,000 life-saving surgeries on children with hydrocephalus

Doctors operate on a patient at Cure Children's Hospital in Mbale, Uganda on February 6, 2017. The hospital has performed more than 10,000 life-saving surgeries on children with hydrocephalus

 A boy diagnosed with Hyrdocephalus lays on a bed at Cure Children's Hospital in Mbale, Uganda on February 6, 2017.

A boy diagnosed with Hyrdocephalus lays on a bed at Cure Children's Hospital in Mbale, Uganda on February 6, 2017.

 Hospital staff pray to start the day at Cure Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

Hospital staff pray to start the day at Cure Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

 A mother with her son, who was diagnosed with Hydrocephalus at Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

A mother with her son, who was diagnosed with Hydrocephalus at Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

 Women who are staying with their children wash clothes inside the Cure hospital compound on February 2, 2017. 

Women who are staying with their children wash clothes inside the Cure hospital compound on February 2, 2017. 

 A nurse checks on Shakira, 2,  who returned after a procedure to relieve pressure failed, at Cure Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Sub-Saharan Africa has only one neurosurgeon for every 10 million people; in the United States and Britain, there is one surgeon for every 100,000 people. People from a number of African countries travel to Mbale for treatment.

A nurse checks on Shakira, 2,  who returned after a procedure to relieve pressure failed, at Cure Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Sub-Saharan Africa has only one neurosurgeon for every 10 million people; in the United States and Britain, there is one surgeon for every 100,000 people. People from a number of African countries travel to Mbale for treatment.

 The exterior of Cure Hospital on February 2, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. The hospital is considered by many to be a industry leader in treating hydrocephalus and spinal bifida.

The exterior of Cure Hospital on February 2, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. The hospital is considered by many to be a industry leader in treating hydrocephalus and spinal bifida.

 A mother breastfeeds her son at Cure Hospital on February 5, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. There are an estimated 400,000 cases of hydrocephalus in the world every year; more than 300,000 of them are in developing nations, and 90% will be fatal without surgery.

A mother breastfeeds her son at Cure Hospital on February 5, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. There are an estimated 400,000 cases of hydrocephalus in the world every year; more than 300,000 of them are in developing nations, and 90% will be fatal without surgery.

 A morning prayer service at the hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

A morning prayer service at the hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

 Amina Naikjoba sits with her son Pongo, 3, at Cure Children's Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Pongo developed an infection associated with the shunt in his head following treatment for Hydrocephalus.

Amina Naikjoba sits with her son Pongo, 3, at Cure Children's Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Pongo developed an infection associated with the shunt in his head following treatment for Hydrocephalus.

 Mothers gather with their children on the compound of Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Some mothers are repeat visitors to this hospital and have returned because of an infection or a problem with a shunt in their child’s head. One woman said fellow villagers thought she had practiced witchcraft after her baby was born with such a deformity.

Mothers gather with their children on the compound of Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Some mothers are repeat visitors to this hospital and have returned because of an infection or a problem with a shunt in their child’s head. One woman said fellow villagers thought she had practiced witchcraft after her baby was born with such a deformity.

Hydrocephalus in Uganda for CNN
 Patients with Hydrocephalus wait for a nurse to make his rounds at Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.
 Excess fluid is seen in a CT scan of a brain at Cure Children's Hospital on February 2, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. The hospital owns one of two CT scan machines serving 8 million people in eastern Uganda.
 Doctors operate on a patient at Cure Children's Hospital in Mbale, Uganda on February 6, 2017. The hospital has performed more than 10,000 life-saving surgeries on children with hydrocephalus
 A boy diagnosed with Hyrdocephalus lays on a bed at Cure Children's Hospital in Mbale, Uganda on February 6, 2017.
 Hospital staff pray to start the day at Cure Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.
 A mother with her son, who was diagnosed with Hydrocephalus at Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.
 Women who are staying with their children wash clothes inside the Cure hospital compound on February 2, 2017. 
 A nurse checks on Shakira, 2,  who returned after a procedure to relieve pressure failed, at Cure Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Sub-Saharan Africa has only one neurosurgeon for every 10 million people; in the United States and Britain, there is one surgeon for every 100,000 people. People from a number of African countries travel to Mbale for treatment.
 The exterior of Cure Hospital on February 2, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. The hospital is considered by many to be a industry leader in treating hydrocephalus and spinal bifida.
 A mother breastfeeds her son at Cure Hospital on February 5, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. There are an estimated 400,000 cases of hydrocephalus in the world every year; more than 300,000 of them are in developing nations, and 90% will be fatal without surgery.
 A morning prayer service at the hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.
 Amina Naikjoba sits with her son Pongo, 3, at Cure Children's Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Pongo developed an infection associated with the shunt in his head following treatment for Hydrocephalus.
 Mothers gather with their children on the compound of Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Some mothers are repeat visitors to this hospital and have returned because of an infection or a problem with a shunt in their child’s head. One woman said fellow villagers thought she had practiced witchcraft after her baby was born with such a deformity.
Hydrocephalus in Uganda for CNN

A boy diagnosed with hydrocephalus cries on a bed at Cure Children's Hospital on February 5, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Hydrocephalus is a condition in which an excess of cerebral fluid accumulates in the brain. The condition, which can be extremely fatal left untreated, causes a harmful amount of pressure on the head and a increase head size.

Patients with Hydrocephalus wait for a nurse to make his rounds at Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

Excess fluid is seen in a CT scan of a brain at Cure Children's Hospital on February 2, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. The hospital owns one of two CT scan machines serving 8 million people in eastern Uganda.

Doctors operate on a patient at Cure Children's Hospital in Mbale, Uganda on February 6, 2017. The hospital has performed more than 10,000 life-saving surgeries on children with hydrocephalus

A boy diagnosed with Hyrdocephalus lays on a bed at Cure Children's Hospital in Mbale, Uganda on February 6, 2017.

Hospital staff pray to start the day at Cure Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

A mother with her son, who was diagnosed with Hydrocephalus at Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

Women who are staying with their children wash clothes inside the Cure hospital compound on February 2, 2017. 

A nurse checks on Shakira, 2,  who returned after a procedure to relieve pressure failed, at Cure Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Sub-Saharan Africa has only one neurosurgeon for every 10 million people; in the United States and Britain, there is one surgeon for every 100,000 people. People from a number of African countries travel to Mbale for treatment.

The exterior of Cure Hospital on February 2, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. The hospital is considered by many to be a industry leader in treating hydrocephalus and spinal bifida.

A mother breastfeeds her son at Cure Hospital on February 5, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. There are an estimated 400,000 cases of hydrocephalus in the world every year; more than 300,000 of them are in developing nations, and 90% will be fatal without surgery.

A morning prayer service at the hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda.

Amina Naikjoba sits with her son Pongo, 3, at Cure Children's Hospital on February 6, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Pongo developed an infection associated with the shunt in his head following treatment for Hydrocephalus.

Mothers gather with their children on the compound of Cure Hospital on February 4, 2017 in Mbale, Uganda. Some mothers are repeat visitors to this hospital and have returned because of an infection or a problem with a shunt in their child’s head. One woman said fellow villagers thought she had practiced witchcraft after her baby was born with such a deformity.

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